The Most Important Thing in Conservation of Biodiversity

People often ask me the question as to if there is one key thing that, when done right, would really make a huge difference in conservation of biodiversity. I often get this question of politicians, who are fond of reducing complex issues into sound-bites. Such folks are not really interested in reading the huge tomes of books that deal with the subject of biodiversity conservation in depth. They are not even interested in reading the lengthy articles on the subject, which occur from time to time in the newspapers and journals. And I can’t blame them: I doubt if I would be reading these things, if my livelihood didn’t depend on it. It is so hard to get people to appreciate biodiversity. Still, I have to answer the question as to whether there is one single thing that, when done right, would really make a difference in the conservation of biodiversity.

The answer is yes: there is indeed one thing that, when done right, would really make a huge difference in conservation of biodiversity. That ‘thing’ is the identification and special protection of endangered species in various habitats. When we talk of ‘conserving’ biodiversity, there is one inference to be made: that there must be some sort of ‘threat’ to the biodiversity, to warrant conservation efforts. And indeed such threat exists: as some species are at risk of getting extinct. With loss of such species, biodiversity would be reduced. So the whole effort is aimed at forestalling the extinction of such species.

In the final analysis, people who are interested in conserving biodiversity should be working hard to identify the species, within their localities, that face the danger of being extinct. They should then be working hard to ensure that such species are protected. If we get this right, it will really make a huge difference in the conservation of biodiversity. Of course, the whole thing is likely to work even better if the effort at conservation of biodiversity is coordinated at the global level. Such coordination can easily be done through the Internet. Using SBCglobal email, for instance, it would just be a question of the various folks who are involved in the conservation effort to go to the SBCglobal login page, and from there log into their Sbcglobal.net email accounts. After logging in, they can then proceed to send messages to each other, regarding their conservation efforts. Such high-level coordination can make a huge difference in the whole effort.

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